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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)
suggests that you were present at a meeting with scotland yard when police officers conducted a murder investigation providing you with evidence that your newspaper was interfering with the pursuit of justice. he mentioned alex marancak, and a member of the metropolitan police. can you tell us more about that meet stph-g. >> i can tell you something about it, but i was asked to recall a meeting that i'd had at scotland yard in 2002, and i had -- i was asked recently i think by channel 4 if that story was referring to my information. and my recollection of that meeting was entirely different. my recollection of the meeting was on a completely different subject. and so i'm only going on what i was told by channel 4. they say it's a meeting in november that i had, that was what was put to me. i checked my diary as much as possible and there was no meeting in november. however, there was a subsequent meeting in very early january. it may be that it was that meeting. that was not my recollection of the meeting. but on the other hand because of the sarah's law campaign i did have some pretty
, and that company is involved with bribing foreign officials, that being detectives at scotland yard, it's a violation of that act. we most frequently see that act being prosecuted with companies opening up plants or supply lines in third world countries and the brother of a prince or son-in-law of a queen gets a contract, basically a bribe, something that's prosecuted here mostly with large corporations doing things like that, but the facts do fit for news corp., if they bribed people at scotland yard to prosecute them in the u.s. >> how serious is the violation of a foreign practices act, something the sort of thing that could have more problems for a company? >> could have more problems, people could go to jail depending on how high you can show there was authorization to violate the act, but the corporation could be put into a monitorship for a period of time as we've seen with wall street companies over the years. they could actually make the company -- have the company lose its charter if they wanted to, but i'd like to move away from the criminal for a second, our federal communic
with members of parliament questioning members of scotland yard. but why would they at the end? because murdoch has a business deal pending that is worth billions of dollars and eventually he wants the parliament's cooperation to buy bskyb. so it would jeopardize possibly his buying of that corporation. >> yes, indeed. and it seems that senior police officers wither in the pay of rupert murdoch, so it is possible that rupert murdoch not only seduced the politicians, but also the police? >> well, they were accuse of that today, and senior investigator tos at scotland yard, and they vigorously denied those charge, but they did open up the door on the possibility that police officers at a lower level were paid for news tips, and it does seem as if there is evidence out there that that was a common practice at least that is what is being alleged right now, it was a common practice of "news of the world" and perhaps other publications belonging to rupert murdoch, but investigators today vehemently denying that there was a conspiracy behind their investigation or the fact that their investigation did
is scheduled to testify next hour. >>> a second resignation from scotland yard, followed one from sunday. they said staying on would be a distraction. >>> during the last hour the commissioner admitted to making mistakes. >> the material is repugnant, with hind site we would have -- yes, i did. thirdly, do i accept the reasons why, i think that is for mr. clark to justify and i think it is a matter for the judicial review. >> today's testimony comes after the reporter who blew the whistle on the hacking was found dead yesterday but his death is not suspicious. he worked at the newspaper under andy carlson who later served as the prime minister's communications chief and arrested in the scandal we should know news corp. is the parent company of fox 5. back to you. >> wow. >> yeah, so a lot going on we will keep an eye on this and let you know when the next thing comes out but a lot going on keeps breaking. >> seems like every hour. >> yes. >> thanks wisdom. >>> now again rupert murdoch and his son's questioning about the phone hacking scandal is set to start in a half hour if it does happ
of scotland yard-- sir paul stephenson-- also denied wrongdoing. he said he was embarrassed that he'd hired a former "news of the world" executive, neil wallis, as a public relations consultant. wallis has now been arrested. >> i had no reason to connect wallis with phone hacking. i had no reason to doubt his impropriety. nothing had come to my attention. i had no knowledge of the previous inquiry, and i had no reason to enquire of the previous inquiry, and i had been given assurances by a senior grade chief constable that actually there was nothing new. >> brown: away from the hearings, scotland yard announced today it found no outside involvement in the death of sean hoare, a former "news of the world" reporter who'd been an early whistleblower in the scandal. hoare was found dead monday at his home north of london. more now on today's hearings and the murdoch media empire. we're joined, from london, by john burns of "the new york times," and from new york, by david folkenflik, who covers the media for npr. so, john burns, what struck you most about the murdoch's message today? >> well, i
december this does to david cameron and the british government, to have both the head of scotland yard, the number two at scotland yard, and the director for cameron himself all either resigned or arrested at this point? it seems like the political fallout in britain is still really continuing. >> i think it's all of the pieces that makes the story so darn interesting, tough to look away. the "wall street journal" today suggesting that people like you, people like me, are far too interested in and we are engaging by taking joy in the pain and misery of mr. murdoch and the people that work there. at the same time, if you looked at the front page of the "wall street journal," splash, big story, three more stories inside. you have an editorial saying you're ganging up on us. well, hey, your own paper, the biggest, most important business paper in the world, saw fit to publish four big hard-hitting stories about it. >> right after the chain saw line, which i thought was a great line, while being insulted by it i admired the insulter. in the same paragraph, you get, they want -- they, you a
the beginning, too. much of the investigation has focused on how cozy this relationship was between scotland yard -- >> do you guys want us to stick around? >> stevenson, the scotland yard chief who has resigned said he's embarrassed by the fact he hired neil wallace to be a media consultant. >> i should say in terms of news for american audience there were some very strong denials here by both from rupert and james murdoch that there was any evidence that 9/11 victims in the united states had their phones hacked. that's important because that's what the fbi is investigating. that is probably the most serious allegation relating to news corp. in the united states that's out there and they couldn't be more emphatic that they've seen no evidence of that and they have no evidence of that. now, again, they've made some pretty strong denials in the past. we'll have to wait and see this play out. but it is worth noting that on that front in familiar they were pretty emphatic. the other point and michelle referred to this is, you know, rupert murdoch was asked point-blank, do you intend to resign a
that you were present at a meeting with scotland yard when police officers provided you with evidence that your newspaper was interfering with justice. he particularly mentions the name of another senior executive and at the meeting a man from metropolitan police, that "news of the world" were guilty of interference and attempt to credit -- discredit a police officer and his wife. can you tell us more about that meeting? >> well, i can tell you something about it but it's -- i was asked to recall a meeting that i had at scotland yard in 2002. i was asked recently, i think by channel 4, about the story you're referring to. my information -- my recollection of that meeting was entirely different. my recollection of the meeting was on a completely different subject so i'm only going on what i was told by channel 4. they say it's a meeting in november but that's what was put to me. i checked my diary as much as possible and there was no meeting in november. however, there was a subsequent meeting and in very early january, so it may be that it was that meeting. that was not my recollectio
. >> absolutely. scotland yard has been embarrassed by the whole situation. scotland yard is taking a very aggressive tactic addressing rebekah brooke. they are getting involve and they not only sounded like they didn't run their newspapers, they sound like they didn't even head their newspapers. anyone who read news of the world or the sun could tell that there were hacked voice mails in there and they had no idea they didn't have the proof. >> give us perspective he was passionate about newspapers. >> sure. this was the best selling newspaper in britain a lot of people and analysts within news corp. said why don't we get rid of the non-money makers and other media venchers. murdoch is an old newspaper man and that's how we came up. he has a sentimental attachment to the papers and when it comes to this side of the atlantic where he keeps the new york post and loses a lot of money and has a lot of influence in new york and nationally, it's because it's part of his power base. that paper and other outlets provide coverage to people who she sympathetic to. not as people who are on the other
: the police out of scotland yard have been in the crosshairs. amy kellogg is live in london beginning our coverage there. >> reporter: when the murdochs testify they are obliged to answer questions quote by their honor. a lot of people are saying because this meeting before a parliamentary committee and judge-led and police-led inquiries, the panel must prove this is not just a piece of political theater. there has been immense media interest. cameras were out as james murdoch left his home to go to news international offices and snappers chased rupert murdoch as he left his home. they will answer questions for an hour. and that's starting in half-hour. then rebekah brooks who used to run murdoch's british newspaper empire until last week will answer questions. a limited number of the public are being allowed in. people were lined up at 7:00 a.m. and the line stretched around the block trying to get a seat. the police are still also under allegation of corruption. this story has so many 10 kals, many threads of inquiry even as it involves police involvement. a news of the word reporter wa
at scotland yard who quit earlier this week facing a separate panel. >> i think we need -- differently in the future, am the media differently. integrity in tact and my conscience is clear. >> reporter: reading from the statement at the end of his parliamentary session, he vows to help police get to the bottom of the phone-hacking scandal and hopes to win back the public's trust. amy kellogg, fox 5 news. >> the paulout continues to grow tonight. -- fallout continues tonight. gene is joining us to talk about the developments. thank you for joining us. >> you're welcome, shawn. >> i want to play you a brief snippet of some of rupert murdoch's testimony today in front of parliament and get your take. all right. >> mr. murdoch, do you accept that ultimately you're responsible for this whole 53asco? nope. >> you have -- you're not responsible? >> the people that i trusted to run and then maybe the people they trusted. i work -- for 52 years and i would trust him with my life. all right, so we heard there the testimony from rupert murdoch. he not only denied responsibility but his company wa
and the role of the media in government. rupert's son, and the british publishing executives and scotland yard top cop all in the dragnet drilled by british lawmakers on allegation of hacking, spying and bribing, oh, yes, all the way up to 10 downing street, the british version of pennsylvania avenue. amazing show for you. i'm dylan ratigan. house is minority whip steny hoyer along talking debt. and
scotland yard for failing to mount a robust investigation. atika shubert joins us live with more on this. let's first talk about rupert murdoch and what he had to say. yesterday he said it was the most humble day of his life. it seems overnight he's written to news corp. staff explaining the situation to them as well. >> reporter: he did. he wrote a letter to staff basically explaining what he said yesterday at the hearing and also making it clear that he was appalled at these phone hacking allegations. one of the things he said in the letter was he has imbued the corporation with an audacious spirit, but this sort of behavior should not be tolerated. he also laid out some of the steps the company is taking to address the issue including setting up an independent standards and management committee. one of the things he also said was that he was sorry for the hurt that was caused, and we have taken responsibility. that's what it says in the letter to employees. of course, one of the things that he said in his hearing yesterday was very -- put very bluntly to him by mp tom watson who asked
in scotland yard. one day after number one man went belly up. and easy to follow flow chart tonight of the tangled relationships between and among murdoch's people and the police and will ask, is it happening here in america as well? >> i think it's all of the pieces that makes the story so darn interesting, tough to look away. wall street journal today suggesting people like you, people like me were far too interested in this and we're engaging by taking joy in the pain and misery of mr. murdoch and the people that work there. at the same time, if you looked at the front page of the wall street journal, splash, big story, three more stories inside. you have an editorial you're ganging up on us, but your own paper, biggest, most important business paper in the world sought it fit to publish four hard-hitting stories about it. >> right after the chain saw line, while being insulted by it i admired the insulter. they want -- they, they want their read toers believe based on no evidence that the to be loid excesses of one publications tarnished thousands of news corp. journalists acros
is the incompetence of scotland yard. the head of scotland yard has left, the deputy to scotland yard has left and the incompetence of london's authorities was very much on display in that hearing room. there are only 50 seats in that room. that's not wembley stadium or yankee stadium. that is a small room. the idea that the authorities there could not keep an assault and that's what this was, an assault, from taking place is just completely outrageous and the people who run parliament security ought to be absolutely ashamed of themselves. >> you mentioned this isn't wembley stadium but the man in custody getting his face wiped by the police looks like he was attending a sporting event. certainly stood out from the suits and the business attire that we saw. we know from our producer in the room that this man came from the back of the room, had a bag, opened up the bag. this all taking place while everybody watched. it seems inconceivable that that could happen. >> you know, all of us in the united states are unhappily used to going through metal detectors, having people check our belongings, b
of the metropolitan police, refer to as scotland yard, have worked for news international advising them in a pr capacity. what worked for the government. there is this kind of seedy revolving door between the police and as powerful media company. as i said, when it is calms down a little, police need to look at self-policing, especially with regard to what people do after they left. but it also seems to be an issue plane corruption. police were being bribed by journalists to provide information. that could end up, as the caller said, it has not been that big a part of the story yet. we could have police facing disciplinary hearings if not criminal prosecutions. host: do you see potential of this bringing down the camden government? guest: -- cameron government? guest: people are beginning to think that. if he had an election in six months, it would be serious. it does not look very good. the scandal last year broke a lot of trust in politicians. now you have got a prime minister who appointed someone, his former communications director, a former editor of "news of the world" when the hacking wa
't think scotland yard and people answering these questions know something else about this story, i would be real surprised. >> mike papantonio, good to have you with us. thanks so much. >> thank you. >>> a chicken hawk republican uses dead american heros to prove a stupid point about the economy. he'll get the special place in the zone next. >>> and this is the scene in green bay, wisconsin, where democrat state senator dave hansen won his recall election, a major victory for the democrats and workers rights in the state of wisconsin. the state senator will join me live. stay with us. he'll get the special place in stay with us. >>> that was the crowd greeting governor scott walker at a new welcome center in wisconsin. his union busting agenda has a lot of folks in the badger state fired up. tonight, they voted against the republicans' attempt to recall state senator dave hansen. he'll join me live from green bay, wisconsin momentarily. stay with us. g as a video game. i need to reach peter, who's falling behind. and push janet who's 6 chapters ahead. ♪ [ male announcer ] with interact
. the firestorm has also swept through scotland yard where two top police officials have had to resign. jim maceda is live in london, jim, set the stage. >> reporter: hi, chuck. well, you're right. all eyes are now on a very small room, very small room, maybe for 40 or 50, behind me in the building there, parliament building. there are overflow rooms. lots of tv sets. this is must-see tv for the brits today, and i would suspect elsewhere as one british politician said yesterday, these are the three musketeers of the murdoch media empire, and the phone hacking scandal, of course, with it. who will be appearing any minute now. to give you a taste of how electric the atmosphere here has been, just a little while -- about an hour ago, rupert murdoch arrived in a vehicle outside of parliament mobbed by dozens, perhaps hundreds of cameramen and photographers to the point where he couldn't get out of his car. he drove up a eventually came in through a back entrance. now, the murdochs and rebekah brooks will be grilled by ten members of something that doesn't sound very threatening called the select commi
were bought and sold. scotland yard claims that people were trying to wreck the current inquiry by leaking allegations the news of the world tried to get some numbers to members of the royal family by blaming police officers. -- bribing police officers. >> once again the ethics that should underpin the relationship between the police and journalists is under scrutiny. police the publicity to help them investigate. but a slew of allegations shows the darker side. >> any journalist trying to persuade police officers to impart sensitive information. that is what the stories are all about. there is a line that cannot be crossed. a member of the royal protection squad has allegedly passed on information and exchange for cash. another profound shock. personal protection officers travel and the same cars as the royals. others are in back of the vehicles. here in the silver van. others guard buildings. the bbc was told that "news of editor was asked for a thousand pounds to be paid to a royal protection officer. the police officer had stolen a confidential directory containing phone num
from members of britain's parliament. in this case that now involves scotland yard, very high-level politicians there. >> cbs news correspondent michelle miller has more on the biggest challenge ever to this powerful media mogul. >> it all shows lack of good judgment. >> reporter: for days, ministers in parliament have called for answers from the man rarely forced to answer anyone. now, rupert murdoch must face british lawmakers in a high-stakes effort to defend himself and his media empire. according to a bloomberg report, the 80-year-old ceo is under growing pressure to step down. and may be replaced by current coo chase kerry. >> they're in big trouble. they have criminal investigations that they have to go through. they have parliamentary investigations and they have a lot of shareholders who are really restless. >> reporter: restless because in the two weeks since the phone hacking scandal broke, stock in murdoch's parent company, news corp, has dropped nearly 15%. a loss of an estimated $6 billion. in 30 years, murdoch transformed a single australian newspaper into the w
. this is producing interests facts between murdoch's newspapers and scotland yards. >> the british tabloid schedule and unprecedented day for the owner at the center of it. elizabeth palmer is outside parliament with the latest. >> reporter: as you said, the murdochs have been testifying in front of what is technically a committee on media culture and sport. but i can tell you that the atmosphere around here is much more like a cross between epic drama and an imposition. the set for this drama, the splendor of britain's westminster parliament. the star of the show, media titan rupert murdoch. as investors around the world hanging on his every word and gesture. he is used to giving orders and not answering questions especially from politicians who until recently held him in either awe or terror. >> this is the most humble day of my life. >> reporter: by his side, his son james, the senior executive in the murdoch family empire. >> the company has admitted liability to victims of illegal voice mail interceptions, has apologized unreservedly, which i repeat today, to those victims, and the company als
was a modest priest from scotland and the one he takes after more is the debonair womanizer. he could read a balance sheet at a glance and always wanted to own things. he went from australia then we know to england and the sunday times and all of the publications in england. he owned 37% of all newspapers in england. that gives him huge political power. in america, he started fox news and the wall street journal. he has had enormous success. what is going on now is very difficult for him. one of the things in his life right now is not being able to acquire b. sky. this is something he wanted to own. if he doesn't own it is because he didn't want it. right now facing the enormous crisis, as you know, he will be appearing in parliament with his son james on tuesday. this story is changing day by day. you mentioned rebekah brooks. the story changes all the time. he also had another failure in china. he wanted to takeover the media in china. the story goes he lost a fortune in china, but found a wife. he is married to somebody who is 42 years younger. he divorced his second wife ann who he was
you something about it. i was asked to recall the meeting at scotland yard in 2002. i was off recently by channel 4 about the story. my information, my recollection of that meeting was entirely different. my recollection is the meeting was on a completely different subject. i am only going on what i was told by channel 4. the meeting in november, that was what was put to me. i checked my diary as much as possible. no meeting in november. but subsequently, very early january it may be that meeting was not my recollection of the meeting. on the other hand, i did have some regular meetings. >> rupert murdoch said he relied on lieutenants that he trusted. who would you trust? >> the news room at any newspaper is trust. if you think about -- i am sure paul farrelly would agree. think about way a story gets published it depends on trust. you rely on people that work for you to behave in a proper manner and you rely on the information you are given at the time. that is why i am with the committee today about the interception of milly dowler's voicemail not commenting on what other people knew
of the world" owner news international parliament looked at scotland yard's initial phone hacking investigation back in 2005 and 2006. the report rips the chief investigator who left the police force and eventually took a job at news international. it slams news international for its "deliberate attempts to block police." david
hired by both 10 downing street and scotland yard. those decisions taking their toll at the top. >> i wish we had -- involvement in this affair differently. i didn't and that is that. >> reporter: rupert murdoch, his son james, and rebekah brooks, the chain of command over the tabloid embroiled by scandal for almost a decade. today, they are called before parliament. >> this isn't a man who doesn't mow what is going on. everybody is scared to death to do anything that he doesn't like so he's the spider in the middle of this web. >> yes, he did apologize many times. i don't think somebody could have held their hands -- head in their hands so many times and say they are they were sorry. >> reporter: an apology, even answers. it may not be enough. ♪ good afternoon to you! it is just after 2:30 in the afternoon. 9:30 on the eastern seaboard. this is an important day in british history in the british parliamentary life and for the media industry, not only in the united kingdom but around the world. the day when rupert murdoch and his son and his former editor go before a parliamentary se
with scotland yard. >> the news international letters demonstrates that they are cooperating with police inquiries, and have evidence and there was evidence they were cooperating because they were providing. unless you contrary evidence that they were deliberately obstructing you in anyway, you cannot get a production lawyer. there's lawyers at this table i know who will reiterate that. you cannot get evidence, and i'm one of them. >> the reality is you are seeking to blame the legal process for something that is actually the metropolitan police fault, isn't? >> completely disagree with your. >> can i ask you this quick do you know who first recommended mr. wallis to mr. fedorcio? >> i don't know that. >> you didn't make inquiries about that when you were asked? [inaudible] >> did you make inquiries about mr. wallis? wallis? at all from a mr. fedorcio? deana who recommended him speakers i do not recall how it came in this process in terms of who else on the list was responsible for producing the tendering process. i'm sure he said that. i was aware, presumably before 31st of august, 29,
a substantial volume of information to the scotland yard, and in return, he received dozens of items of confidential and for action from the police and that is the obligation. >> most journalists who work for the crime editor or half a working relationship and their particular police force. >> when our report was published in early 2010 was when you were chief executive of news international, and there were certain things we're obviously we found that the evidence from the people from the news international was unsatisfactory and collecting in nisha we refer to in the reports and we felt it was inconceivable that he was a reporter as passed on to that we refer to the e-mail and all that kind of stuff. when you were the chief executive of news international at the time that report was published did you read the report we published? >> yes, i did. i'm not saying i read every word but a large majority. i read the criticisms that were addressed to the company, and i can only hope that from the evidence that you heard from us today that we have really stepped up our investigation and that
were bought and sold. scotland yard got testy today claiming people were trying to leak allegations that the "news of the world" tried to get phone numbers to members of the royal family by bribing police officer. richard watson now from the police. >> once again the ethics which should underpin the relationship between police and journalists is under scrutiny. as never before. when it works, cops need publicity to help them investigate. but a sort of allegations in recent days shows the darker side. >> any journalist work is sold -- sensitive information. that's what excludes them. but clearly there is a line that can't be crossed, and today's news as a member of the royal protection squad has allegedly passed on information for return for cash to come is yet another profound shock. >> personal protection officers travel in the same car as the royals. close protection officers in backup vehicles. others guard buildings. the bbc was told today that the notion of the "news of the world" former royal editor asked his editor who went on to work for the p.m. for 1000 pounds to be paid t
stated, has established a group to cooperate fully with the police and scotland yard. a police agency that is not absent its own issues. the top two police officers in london have since resigned. now we are awaiting rebekah brooks, a long-time executive with news corporation, the parent company of the fox news channel. brooks ran the tabloid "news of the world" when the hacking occurred some six to eight years ago. she has since resigned her position with the company last friday. as we await on ms. brooks, shares of news corporation, rather, are trading on wall street. they're up 5% during the testimony of the past three hours. our coverage continues from london. and also with happ being now. -- "happening now." our colleagues to follow us. after this commercial break. i'm bill hemmer in new york. diabetes testing? it's all the same. nothing changes. then try this. freestyle lite® blood glucose test strip. sure, but it's not gonna-- [beep] wow. yep, that's the patented freestyle zipwik™ design. did it just-- [both] target the blood? yeah, drew it right in. the test starts fast. you
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)